All Articles by Gastroenterology Associates

How Do You Get H. Pylori?

H. pylori is a very common type of bacteria that may be introduced to the body via food, water, or bodily fluids, and could eventually cause peptic ulcers.
August 14, 2019

Helicobacter pylori, or H. pylori, is a type of bacteria that may infect the stomach lining. It is estimated that much of the world’s population has H. pylori in their system, but not everyone harboring the bacteria will experience symptoms of an associated infection.


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How to Go Gluten-Free

Tips for switching to a gluten-free diet include consulting a nutritionist, knowing food properties, asking questions, utilizing menu labels, and more.
July 23, 2019

Those living with celiac disease or another form of gluten sensitivity are warned to eliminate gluten entirely from their diets to avoid inflammation and other side effects associated with ingesting the protein. Many who do not suffer from this intolerance are also discovering that maintaining a gluten-free diet could be a healthy alternative to their current Western diets, which are typically laden with gluten-containing products, such as bread, cereals, baked goods, pasta, etc.

If you are looking to kick gluten for any reason, here are several helpful tips for a smooth transition:


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What Causes Acid Reflux?

Acid reflux may be triggered for a number of reasons, including hiatal hernia, pregnancy, smoking, or eating certain foods.
July 08, 2019

Acid reflux happens when the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), a ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach, does not operate correctly. The job of the lower esophageal sphincter is to relax to let food pass through to the stomach, then close to prevent stomach acid from creeping into the esophagus. When the tissue is weakened or malfunctions in some way, stomach acid may splash back into the esophagus and cause inflammation that we often refer to as “heartburn.”


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What Is GERD?

GERD, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, is a common digestive disorder characterized by the chronic passage of stomach acid into the esophagus.
June 24, 2019

In the medical world, GERD is an acronym for Gastroesophageal reflux disease. It’s a digestive disorder related to the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), a ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach.

Normally, the LES relaxes and opens its ring to allow food to enter the stomach, then closes back up. With GERD, the LES is weakened or moves in an abnormal way that leaves the passageway open for stomach acid to splash back up into the esophagus. Your stomach is equipped to handle the stomach acid, but over time, that same stomach acid could be erosive to your esophagus. The inflammation caused by stomach acid is referred to as acid reflux, or often felt as heartburn.


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Catch Colorectal Cancer Early

Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. By taking preventative screening measures, you can greatly reduce your risk.
June 07, 2019

Together, colon and rectal cancers (often referred to as colorectal cancer) are the third most common type in the United States, with an estimated 145,600 new cases and 51,020 deaths expected in 2019. You can significantly lower your risk of developing advanced colorectal cancer by knowing your risks and taking proactive screening measures to detect polyps. If all adults over the age of 45 received preventative screening, as is recommended by the American Cancer Society, thousands of colorectal cancer-related deaths could be avoided, each year.


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Doctors & Survivors Stress Prevention at Gastroenterology Associates' Annual Colorectal Cancer Awareness Event

Nassau County Legis. Rose Walker joined staff and patients of Gastroenterology Associates at annual event to raise awareness about colorectal cancer.
May 08, 2019

To raise awareness about the dangers of colorectal cancer, also known as colon cancer, Gastroenterology Associates (GA)—one of the largest gastroenterology practices on Long Island—hosts an annual gathering of doctors, staff, lawmakers, and patients at its partner outpatient facility, Long Island Center for Digestive Health (LICDH). Its goal is to decrease the incidence of colon cancer, and increase early detection. [VIDEO]


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Watch Out for These Colorectal Cancer Symptoms

Colorectal cancer symptoms include sudden changes in bowel movements, persistent abdominal pain and unexplained weight loss, among others.
April 15, 2019

Colorectal cancer (CRC), also called colon cancer, occurs in the last two parts of the digestive tract: the large intestine, or colon, and rectum. Symptoms of colorectal cancer include persistent abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, and blood in the stool.


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Colorectal Cancer Stages

Colorectal cancer can advance through five distinct stages, labeled 0 to 4, increasing in numerical value with the severity and spread of the disease.
March 15, 2019

When a patient is diagnosed with colorectal cancer, one of the first questions they’ll want to be answered is: “What stage is it?” Stages of colon cancer, like most others involving a tumor, are broken down into five groups, labeled 0 to 4. The numbers increase with the severity of the disease.


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Eating With Celiac Disease

Those living with celiac disease must refrain from consuming foods containing gluten, wheat, barley and rye, but can enjoy meat and poultry, fish and seafood, tofu, dairy, fruits, vegetables, beans, legumes, nuts, and more.
February 21, 2019

People with celiac disease must maintain diets completely devoid of gluten to avoid aggravating symptoms that damage the bowel. A diagnosis may seem severely limiting, with an endless sea of "no"—no bread, no pasta, no beer—but with some nutritional guidance, celiac patients can enjoy delicious meals with the same confidence the unafflicted may take for granted.


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Ulcerative Colitis 101

Ulcerative colitis is a form of inflammatory bowel disease that is similar to Crohn's disease. Symptoms include, but are not limited to, diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding.
February 06, 2019

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is one of two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The other is Crohn's disease. Both are chronic conditions—there is no cure for IBD—with some important differences. While Crohn's may affect any portion of the gastroinstestinal tract, for example, ulcerative colitis tends to only impact the innermost lining of the colon (large intestine) and rectum.


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What Are the Symptoms of Crohn's Disease?

Symptoms of Crohn's disease include abdominal pain/cramping, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and diarrhea, among others.
January 23, 2019

Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal condition, and one of the two most common forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, or IBD. The other is ulcerative colitis. First described by Dr. Burrill B. Crohn in 1932, Crohn’s disease can affect any part of the digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus, whereas ulcerative colitis strictly impacts the colon.


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Do You Have IBS? (Quiz)

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) affects roughly 10% of Americans. Symptoms include but are not limited to abdominal pain, nausea, cramping, persistent bloating, diarrhea and/or constipation. Take this three-question quiz to determine whether or not you may be dealing with an undiagnosed case of IBS.
November 27, 2018

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) associated with varying triggers, including stress, depression, anxiety, or previous intestinal infection. Approximately 10% of people suffer from IBS, making it the most common FGID.


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6 Signs You Need to See a Gastroenterologist

Abnormal bowel movements, rectal bleeding, frequent heartburn, abdominal pain/bloating, trouble swallowing, and 50+ years of age are all triggers for scheduling a consultation with a gastroenterologist.
October 03, 2018

You may be instructed to visit a gastroenterologist, a digestive diseases specialist, if you are experiencing symptoms such as abnormal bowel movements, rectal bleeding, frequent heartburn, abdominal pain, bloating, trouble swallowing, or are of age to begin regularly screening for colorectal cancer.


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7 Proactive Steps Toward a Safer Colon

Sure, there are environmental and even genetic factors that help determine whether or not someone will develop a disease of the colon, but there are plenty of lifestyle choices to help minimize the risk, too. Here are seven proactive steps you can take to help improve your colorectal health.
August 28, 2018

Your colon is an integral part of your digestive system. This year, an estimated 97,220 people in the United States will be diagnosed with colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer.


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Long Island Center for Digestive Health Wins APEX Quality Award

For the fourth consecutive year, Long Island Center for Digestive Health (LICDH) has been awarded the prestigious APEX Quality Award, a national mark of distinction recognizing providers who demonstrate the highest level of patient satisfaction and overall care.
July 25, 2018

We’re Honored!

Long Island Center for Digestive Health (LICDH) proudly announces we have been named the recipient of the 2017 APEX Quality Award, for the fourth consecutive year.


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Understanding Gallbladder Pain

Gallbladder pain originates in the upper right quadrant of your abdomen and ranges from mild to severe.
July 06, 2018

The pain associated with gallstones (cholelithiasis) and gallbladder inflammation (cholecystitis) can be excruciating. Consequently, learning how to properly identify and remedy such attacks is mission critical.

The following breaks down the fundamental facts about the gallbladder and this common condition affecting approximately 10 to 15 percent of the U.S. adult population—with about 1 million cases presenting annually—including preventative measures and treatment options.


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What to Expect: Colonoscopy vs Upper Endoscopy

To understand a colonoscopy vs upper endoscopy, it's important to note the procedures' similarities and distinctions—such as their combined role investigating symptoms and identifying and removing cancerous and pre-cancerous polyps; as well as the different digestive tract regions inspected by each.
May 10, 2018

A colonoscopy and upper endoscopy are two procedures performed frequently by gastroenterologists to view and examine various portions of your digestive tract. Colonoscopies inspect the large intestine (colon and rectum) while upper endoscopies observe the esophagus, stomach and the first part of the small intestine.


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Start Spreading the News: It's Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month! Read about the success of this educational effort put forth by President Clinton in February 2000. Also includes information regarding individuals who may have a heightened risk of developing colorectal cancer.
March 23, 2018

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month! That means it’s the perfect time for healthcare providers and their patients to join forces in continuing to spread awareness about the disease itself, as well as about screening, prevention, and treatment.


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Stress-Free Upper Endoscopy Preparation Guide

To prepare for an Upper Endoscopy (EGD), you’ll be instructed to refrain from certain food and drink in the hours, or days, leading up to your procedure. Diabetics, smokers, and those on certain medications may be given additional instructions for EGD preparation.
March 23, 2018

An upper endoscopy (or EGD) is a simple and safe procedure that benefits the lives of millions of Americans each year. Still, we know that scheduling an upper endoscopy could be intimidating, so we put together some information to shed light on the procedure and preparation guidelines to alleviate some of your worries.


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Lawmakers & Survivors Join Gastroenterology Associates In Raising Colorectal Cancer Awareness

Congresswoman Kathleen Rice and Nassau Legis. Rose Walker joined doctors, staff, and patients of Gastroenterology Associates in annual event to raise awareness about colorectal cancer.
March 23, 2018

In what has become an important annual tradition of spreading vital information in the ongoing battle against colorectal cancer, local lawmakers including U.S. Rep. Kathleen Rice and Nassau County Legis. Rose Walker once again joined doctors, staff, and patients of Gastroenterology Associates—one of the largest gastroenterology practices on Long Island—for a special recent gathering at its outpatient facility Long Island Center for Digestive Health in Uniondale to raise awareness about this deadly disease.    


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